Africa Adventure Tours and Overlanding Stories by Nomad

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Namibia Aerial Acrobatics! Skydiving in Swakopmund!

BY: CHEMONE CARPENTER | 2012-11-19

The very first time I ever came to the realization that I was going to be skydiving was literally when I was in the activity centre in SwakopmundNamibia standing in the queue to pay for it … Yup… that was it, I’m doing this!

The next morning a group of us were collected in a small van and we headed off into the desert.  There were quite a few of us and upon arrival at the hanger in the middle of nowhere in the Namibian Desert, we were greeted by another approximately 60 people all waiting for their chance to brave gravity and throw themselves out of a perfectly good aeroplane!  Oh dear…  What had I been thinking!

Getting ready to skydive

Everyone there was so supportive and happy and seemed to have no cares in the world at all, they had a small radio playing and it was very festive with everyone hiding their fears on the inside.  They suited up, climbed into the plane, soared off into the sky and then one by one they jumped and landed… simple!

My turn next!  The harness fitted snugly between my legs and under my arms, it was very tight and rightly so!  They wormed me into the suit as I had to be as secure as possible to remain attached to them when we jumped out of the aeroplane.  Harnessed up, all set and scared to death, off we went!  My palms were sweaty, my heart was racing, yet other than that I felt calm.  We climbed into our little plane feeling like sardines as we launched into the air.

Skydivers in their jumpsuits and in the plane

Looking back, and at the photos above, it really does look like I am over the moon to be travelling at snail speed in the smallest plane known to man, climbing to heights no one could ever fathom wanting to throw yourself out of?

Before I tell you what it is actually like to throw yourself out of the plane, I have to tell you that I did it again!  Yes, I did it again…  It is honestly the most amazing and truly amazing adrenalin rush you could ever dream of!  My new goal is now, one jump a year!

I’ll try to get together the correct words for this phenomenal experience:

Chemone Skydiving

They slide you slowly to the edge of the plane, kick your legs out so that you are literally just hanging onto the front of your jump buddy on the outside of the plane.  You look down and look around not really able to comprehend what you are about to do.  He starts rocking you, taps your shoulder and gives you a thumbs up.  3…. 2… 1.. and off you go!!

You drop at an incredible rate with the wind blowing past you so quickly that through all the screaming and all the magical and expressive words you can possibly use in your 36 seconds of freefall, you are left with a very dry mouth, a heartbeat that feels like it is now on the outside of your chest and a smile that no one could ever take away from you!  You did it!  The sky is no more the limit!  Conquered!

After my jump, I found this on the wall in Swakopmund Jump Club which is the best description of the life changing experience of throwing yourself out of an aeroplane!

Skydiving Quote

You must jump to know, no words can describe the incredible rush when the wind invides you to play.  You are one of the few.  For a moment you doubt, but the doubt is short lived, as gravity pulls you from the safety of the plane you understand, this is freedom!  No turning back now, but who would want to??  The dream of human flight.  You know what it means to SKYDIVE!

Swakopmund is the adventure capital of Namibia and there are so many phenomenal activities to do here!  You can visit Swakopmund on a number of our tours and experience all of these activities yourself!  Here are a few of your options:

Camping:

20 Day Vic Falls to Cape Town – available in the opposite direction
14 Day Vic Falls to Swakopmund (Desert and Delta) – available in the opposite direction
12 Day Cape Town to Windhoek (Namibian Experience) – available in the opposite direction
7 Day Cape Town to Swakopmund (Desert Explorer) – available in the opposite direction

Accommodated:

7 Day Desert Explorer (Cape Town to Swakopmund)
12 Day Best of Namibia (Cape Town to Windhoek)
14 Day Desert and Delta (Swakopmund to Victoria Falls)
20 Day Cape Town to Victoria Falls 

 

 


Dreaming of Travelling to Africa?

BY: JESSICA BARKER | 2012-11-07

If there’s one place in the world that you have to visit, it’s Africa!

What is it that makes you want to travel?  I’m not talking about taking a weekend outing with your friends; I’m talking about the kind of travel that makes you come alive!  The kind of travel where you push all your boundaries, slip in and out of your comfort zone, live and experience adventures that are outside your realm of possibility!

Jumping for Joy
Looking over Blyde River Canyon

What is it that makes you book that long haul flight and travel half way across the globe?  Is it simply curiosity?  A bucket list maybe?  Or have you been inspired by a friend or family member who has done a similar trip?  Did you see a mind blowing programme on television or read something on the internet that inspired you?  Ultimately, each of us have a story that we want to create and tell and we all have an endless yearning to make that story the most interesting and exciting story out there!  The human spirit is always on the lookout for a unique experience, a new environment and a moment that will intrinsically change its way of life.

On the Top of Kilimanjaro, Uhuru Peak
On the Equator in Uganda

If this sounds like you, you need to come to Africa, and if you’ve been here before, you have to come again.  If you have never considered Africa as the ultimate destination, it’s time to take your journey of discovery and start talking, listening, watching and reading about the endless possibilities and the life changing encounters that could be yours!  For those of you who have visited, spread the love and tell your stories and get ready to create new ones as every visit will astound you with the abundant variety and possibilities.

Cute Himba Kid

Be warned, Africa will capture your heart!  You will fall in love with her people, no matter what colour or creed.  Families, who have struggled for survival in the harshest environments, financially own nothing, yet are the kindest and most generous of spirit and soul.  They will easily offer you the gift of new friendship and dazzle you with their uninhibited smiles and vicarious way of life.  Africa, a land of mighty warriorsnomadic pastoralists and hunter gatherers.

Okavango Sunset in a Mokoro

Watch the sun set over the ocean then simply turn around and watch the moon rise over the mountains, stand on the Southernmost tip of Africa, walk in the bush with wild animals, have a foot in each Tropic or on either side of the Equator, trek through tropical rain forests to see one of the world’s most endangered primates or climb craggy mountains on horseback, soak up the sun on an endless white sand beach or watch the sun rise from the top of one of the most ancient deserts in the world!  The wide open spaces, the diamond sparkling night skies and the endless possibility of experiences will captivate your spirit.

The animals that you will encounter are being pushed to the brink of extinction by the growth of the population and man’s endless demand for more resources.  When you visit, your park fee contribution will go towards ensuring the survival of these unique and fascinating species.  There are not many places on earth where you can witness a leopard hunting an impala, dive with a great white shark, sleep in a tent with no fences between you and the wilderness, walk with a rhino or dodge a hippo.

Two big male lions

How can you afford to miss out?  You can’t!  So come and play with us and have an authentic African experience as you discover all the quirky charms this fascinating continent has to offer.

Jumping Masai

For more information on any of these tours, please email us on nomad@nomadtours.co.za or you can call us on             +27 (0)21 845 6310      


Expect the Unexpected – a waterfall in the Namibian desert!!

Sunset and a waterfall in the Namibian Desert

I have been fortunate enough to participate in three scheduled tours with Nomad and decided it was time to share the experience with my friends, so we headed to Namibia for 10 days, on a private charter, booked through the Groups & Charters department.  We decided February was the most convenient for us, taking into account our work schedules and for our overseas based friends to be able to join.

The route was simple, but most importantly included all the highlights Namibia has to offer, Orange RiverFish River Canyon, Namib-Naukluft Park, SossusvleiSwakopmundEtosha National Park & Windhoek, or so that was what we planned & expected, what we got was the “unexpected”….

Heading North from Cape Town, we made our first overnight stop at the Orange River, now what I need to explain is that a few weeks before our trip, we received news of “heavy rains”, “not seen in decades” in Namibia.  “Really?  But it’s a desert, it never rains in a desert, does it?”. 

Crossing the border between South Africa and Namibia, we had our first glimpse of the “heavy rains” and upon arrival at our overnight stop, we saw further evidence, but, we had blue skies, sunshine and the most delicious bobotie (a dish of curried mince with an egg custard baked on top) for supper, besides, we were on holiday, what’s a bit of heavy flowing water?  As we had a mixture of camping & accommodated, the campers chose to sleep under the stars, while those that chose accommodated settled into their river facing bungalows for the night.

Water Under The Bridge Felix Camp under water

Our journey continued north, next stop Ai-Ais hot springs, tucked away in the southern end of the Fish River Canyon.  The afternoon was relaxed with a few rounds of poker being played while the chicken potjie was on the go.  As the evening approached, we all hopped on the truck and headed to the Fish River Canyon viewing site for a spectacular sunset, and spectacular it was!  We spent about an hour hanging out at the Canyon viewing point just staring into the sunset and beyond.

Day three greeted us with a sprinkling of rain as we headed for the Namib-Naukluft National Park and our overnight spot, Sesriem.  Every kilometre driven showed more evidence of the “heavy rains”, the normally dusty gravel roads were soaked, muddy and slippery which made for an interesting ride.  The landscape was something I had never before witnessed – green, green, green.  Having travelled to Namibia on many previous occasions with my family, I was used to the dry, arid landscape, I was in awe at the amount of water and the shrubbery and felt privileged to have been able to see the desert this way.   Upon arrival at Sesriem, we pitched our tents, lit the fire and had an early night in preparation for our earliest morning and the climbing of Dune 45 at sunrise.

A green desert A muddy lunch stop

Sadly our dream of climbing Dune 45 did not materialise, the road into Sesriem and Sossusvlei was closed as the river had come down during the night which made the road impassable, however, this did not deter us as we made our way into Sesriem and found the next best dune called Elim dune.  Taking all the huffing and puffing into account to get to the top of the dune, it was all well worth it.  While we were up there, a hearty cooked breakfast was being prepared, which we gobbled down upon our return to the truck.  Next stop… Swakopmund.

Now this is where the fun really began and the warnings of “heavy rains” started making sense.  Just outside Solitaire we came across a number of cars parked in the road, the river was in full flow over the road and was impassable.  Luckily there was a detour further back, so we backtracked and carried on our merry way, it was after all tea time and we were salivating just thinking about the famous Solitaire apple pie.

Examining the road Road Washed Away

Take a moment to notice the beautiful blue skies, we opted to spend a few moments admiring this raging river and photographing it as we all thought it rather impressive.  Finally, after our detour, we made it to our warm apple pie.  If ever you find yourself in Solitaire, buy yourself two slices, one to eat while in Solitaire and the other to save for later, you will regret it if you don’t!

Now what I have not mentioned yet is that Sonny, our beloved truck, developed a disliking to the mud, rain and river beds which he had to pass through on the last two days, he was starting to choke up.  But it was manageable as we would be in Swakopmund within a couple of hours and there Sonny could be sorted out and given a rest.  Ready to leave Solitaire, we heard a couple of stories from the shop assistants that the Kuiseb pass was closed as the river was raging down, that is the only direct route to Swakopmund from Solitaire.  In the meantime, another Nomad truck had pulled into Solitaire, and a second truck was well on his way to go and investigate the Kuiseb situation.  We decided to follow truck #2 and investigate the Kuiseb pass, after all, we wanted our photo at the Tropic of Capricorn which was in the same direction, so off we went, poor Sonny huffing and puffing along.

While having our pics taken at the Capricorn sign, in the distance we saw truck #2 coming back, not a good sign, he was headed back to Solitaire as Kuiseb was full of debris and there was a strong build up of water.  Back in Sonny, we turned around and headed back to Solitaire, once there we would plan our next move.  Heading back to Solitaire, we saw the reality of the situation right before our eyes!  A huge big rain storm was in front of us and we were heading straight for it.

Another Storm is Brewing

Sonny had now decided enough was enough and he was going to wait while the rain passed, so we decided to wait with him.  While our guide and driver attended to the problem, we watched as the storm moved over and so the downpour began.  Who would have thought that a river could form within five minutes!

Waiting out the storm in Solitaire

It was late afternoon and we were still waiting in Solitaire, would we still make Swakopmund?  The baker of the famous apple pie had just heard a rumour that there was a grader down in Kuiseb busy moving debris and the pass would be open soon.  Truck #2 headed back down to the Kuiseb Pass.  Sonny was still being stubborn, so we waited.  Truck #1 in the meantime also decided to leave, after consultation with our operations department, they headed to Swakopmund via Windhoek on the C24.  By now it was probably around 15:30, our guide proposed the alternative, that we follow truck #1 to Windhoek and onto Swakopmund, which meant arrival in Swakopmund would be late, very late.  We all agreed to and were very happy with this plan (we had big plans in Swakopmund, we packed the snowboard to play on the dunes and we had a birthday to celebrate).

Truck Sonny getting some love

Off we headed towards the C24, cellphone reception was dodgy while we were making our way through the mountains, so only about an hour into the drive, our C24 journey came to an abrupt end as a message was received from Tosca, our beloved operations manager “STOP, C24 has been closed – road in bad condition, do not proceed” (in case you were wondering, Sonny had since been given a good talking to and was happy to continue).  We all stood there, in the mud in the middle of nowhere, speechless.  Our operations department had already put Plan B into motion, we would be backtracking to a lodge just between Sesriem and Solitaire.

Getting to our Plan B overnight stop was without incident, back through the mountains, past the detour and so we arrived.  Lucky to have a beautiful sunset and a once-in-a-lifetime phenomenon – a waterfall in the surrounding desert mountains!  Yes, a waterfall in the middle of the desert, how many people can honestly say they have seen a waterfall in the desert of Namibia?  After a long day on the road, well, over 500km, 10 hours in and out of Sonny, we ended up 47km from Sesriem, where we had started that morning.

Sunset and a waterfall in the desert

After a group meeting, we all agreed that to go to Swakopmund would no longer be realistic and therefore opted to proceed north, to the gates of Etosha National Park, which would mean we would have more time to explore Etosha and relax.  The C24 had been opened and off we went, quick shop stop in Windhoek and onto Outjo where we spent the night in Plan C accommodation.

And so we entered Etosha National Park and the game viewing started immediately.  Over the next few days, we would encounter an old male elephant, 2 packs of lions, a rhino and her calf at the watering hold in Halali, antelope and various bird species.   And what would a trip to Etosha be without a stop on the pans themselves.

Desert elephant and lion in Etosha
Salt pans in Etosha

After 2 wonderful days of sunshine, spending hours staring at the campsite waterholes, we said goodbye to Etosha and headed back South to Windhoek, which would be our second last night of our tour.  While we only had one night in Windhoek, we chose to spend this evening at Joe’s Beer House, enjoying a great meal.

Our second last day of tour saw us taking the long drive back down to the Orange River, back to where our journey had begun 8 days earlier.  Having had a late night out in Windhoek, the morning felt a bit rough, so I thought it would be a good idea to slip on my three quarter pyjama pants and travel in those, after all, it was going to be a long day in the truck and comfort was my number 1 priority.

Just outside a town called Rehoboth we pulled off to the side of the road to have a quick “bathroom” stop, making use of bathroom #3 (which for those that have travelled with us before will know is a bush toilet), you look for a bush and squat.  Myself and two others eyed out the perfect spot and off we went through the ankle high grass.  All of a sudden, there is a scream and my name being called!  With a “WTF” expression on my face, I turned around to my friend who was waving her hands and screaming wildly, yet no words came out her mouth.

In the movement of me turning around and my “WTF” face – something became entangled in my legs, natural instinct told me to start screaming, jump, shake my legs and run!!  S.N.A.K.E!!  Aha, that is what my friend was trying to warn me about!  I stood on a snake and apparently not a small one either.  The moral of the story, never wear your pyjama pants when in the bush!

And so we arrived at the Orange River, our final night of our adventure.  Exhausted, we had a refreshing swim followed by copious amounts of red wine, reminiscing about our last 9 days.  Our last day saw us head back to Cape Town.  Our wonderful, memorable adventure had come to an end, but that was not the last adventure, as soon, we would be heading to Mozambique to start a brand new adventure!

Namibia is a dry country, please adapt! 

Join us on and adventure of your own!  Contact our Groups and Charter department if you’d like to build your own tour:  groups@nomadtours.co.za 

If you would prefer to join us one one of our scheduled tours to experience Namibia – we have a whole selection for you!

Camping:

20 Day Vic Falls to Cape Town – available in the opposite direction
14 Day Vic Falls to Swakopmund (Desert and Delta) – available in the opposite direction
12 Day Cape Town to Windhoek (Best of Namibia) – available in the opposite direction
7 Day Cape Town to Swakopmund (Desert Explorer) – available in the opposite direction

Accommodated:

7 Day Desert Explorer (Cape Town to Swakopmund)
12 Day Namibian Experience (Cape Town to Windhoek)
14 Day Desert and Delta (Swakopmund to Victoria Falls)
20 Day Cape Town to Victoria Falls 

BY: ANNELIESE KORSCH | 2012-10-29


How to minimise your risk when booking your dream holiday adventure tour!

Off the back of the unfortunate collapse of overland tour operator, Kumuka Worldwide, and an unstable market economy, we’d like to offer you a few suggestions of how to ensure that your dream holiday does not get ripped out from underneath you before you’ve even travelled.

It is not likely that your personal travel insurance or a travel company’s bond (which insures your deposit or full payment) will fully cover every single traveller if a tour operator goes into liquidation.  Do your homework and find out as much information about the company that you’re going to be travelling with before booking your next tour.

Whether you’re booking through a travel agency or directly with a tour operator, you are entitled to information about the company that you’re planning on travelling with.  A few questions that you could ask your consultant are:

  • What is the tour company doing to improve its standards and ensure growth in the market?
  • Is the company currently active on travel forums and social media sites?
  • Has the company gone through any redundancies or restructuring in the last 6 months?
  • What sustainable best practices does the company adhere to?If a tour operator is offering exceptionally large standing discounts and add-ons, this is indicative of either a pricing error, a lack of bookings or the inevitable cutting of corners on tour.  None of these bode well for future tour operations.

To answer these questions for you from Nomad’s perspective:

Currently, our trucks are full and we have had to rent in additional trucks to cover our requirements.  We are also currently building 6 new truck bodies to cater for the demand and to improve the quality of our trucks.  All of our trucks on the road are less than 5 years old and are SABS (South African Bureau of Standards) compliant , making them the safest and well-maintained adventure trucks on the road in Southern and East Africa.

We are continually and consistently active on travel forums and social media sites to ensure that guests have a clear understanding of our product.  We also use these platforms to advise on any situation and to respond to any constructive feedback from our guests.

Nomad has not had any redundancies or restructuring and 2012 has seen us experiencing our best sales months in Nomad history.

We invest in our guides education and careers to ensure that they are knowledgeable and passionate about Africa and the tours they are running. Continuous investment in our trucks ensures that they are some of the safest on the road and as we are a local specialist, we are always close at hand to resolve any situation immediately.  We maintain a rigorous maintenance schedule on our trucks and each one is roadworthy tested every six months.

We do offer select discounts on specific departures to ensure that we run full and healthy tours but no standing discounts or add-ons.

We’d love to have you on tour with us to experience the wonders that Africa has to offer, please do come and join us!  Our sincerest condolences go out to those who have been affected by Kumuka Worldwide’s collapse.

http://www.nomadtours.co.za


Part 3 of Monika Grabowska’s Cape Town to Victoria Falls tour… enjoy!

World's heritage travel

delta

We are now getting closer to the end of our journey. The final destination of this three-week trip was Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe and I’ll soon describe what I think about this world heritage site. This journey started in South Africa, we went through Namibia and I’ll soon describe rest of the trip. Have you missed the beginning, just go back two posts.

After Etosha National Park it was time to see one more city. We visited Windhoek, the capital of Namibia. It was just a city and we wanted to see nature, so we didn’t spend so much time there. Why should we. We visited a restaurant though and had some pretty good meat. Maybe it was a typical touristic place and nothing to brag about, but it was still tasty and felt good.

From Namibia we went on to Botswana. We got flat tire twice, so it was…

View original post 871 more words


Part 2 of Monika Grabowska’s Cape to Vic Falls Tour

World's heritage travel

Zebra

After a week on the road with sleeping in tents and eating by a camp fire we were dirty and tired and then came the luxury: a hostel with normal beds in a town by the Atlantic Ocean, called Swapkomund.That’s not enough, we also went out and ate in a real restaurant, that served all kinds of wonderfull food from pizza to wild meat, like springbook or oryx.

On the way to Swapkomund we  passed the tropic of Capricorn and saw a desrt-part that looked like a moon landscape. It was very different from the other parts of the desert. A whole new planet.

We continued throgh the desert and suddenly the desert became a beach and we reached the ocean and the town of Swapkomund. The border between desert and beach was a road.

In Swapkomund or Walvis bay nearby we  were supposed to see flamingos, but they didn’t…

View original post 516 more words


Part 1 of Monika Grabowska’s Cape to Vic Falls Tour!

World's heritage travel

My trip to see the Vic Falls in Zimbabwe was the most amazing trip I’ve ever done so far. Not only because of the Vic Falls, but the waterfall was a big part of it. Victoria Falls was added to the world heritage list in 1989. The waterfall is almost 2 km long and the fall is 109 meters high on the highest place. And it is magnificent. It’s difficult to imagine the amount of water falling down from the Zambezi river. You just have to see it.

But let’s start from the beginning. It was December of 2010 and Europe was covered in massive amounts of snow. Around Christmas there was so much snow that many of the major airports were closed. Families were split apart, waiting for their loved ones to come for Christmas. Other went away for Christmas and could not return home. When the airports opened…

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Win a Free Masai Mara and Gorilla tour with Nomad Tours and Safari Interactive Magazine!

Win a FREE Masai Mara and Gorilla Tour

Answer an easy question and win a Masai Mara & Gorilla trekking adventure with Safari Interactive Magazine and Nomad Africa Adventure Tours

Win a Masai Mara and Gorillas Trekking Tour

Click on the competition page to win a Masai Mara and Gorilla Trekking tour with Nomad Africa Adventure Tours, read the article on page 15

 

We are also running a special at the moment: **FREE GORILLA PERMITS** on the following departures;

 

Tour

Code

NMG

1237 – 23 May 2012          

NMG

1253 – 18 July 2012          

NMG

1265 – 29 August 2012     

NMG

1269 – 12 September 2012 

NMG

  1273 – 26 September 2012 

 

There is no catch, book any of the above listed tours and receive a free gorilla permit (one permit per guest).  This is for all bookings made between today and the end of May 2012.


Nomad Africa’s Masai Mara and Gorillas Tour, Part One by Caroline Kullendorff

One of our guests, Caroline Kullendorff, very kindly let me steal some of her photos from her Facebook page to give you a better idea of what to expect when coming on a camping tour with us to see the Masai Mara and Uganda’s Silverback Mountain Gorilla… This is part one of her tour, from Nairobi to Kampala

Construction work outside our hotel in Nairobi

Construction work outside our hotel in Nairobi

Caroline at the Great Rift Valley

Caroline at the Great Rift Valley

The roads in East Africa are not for the feint hearted!

The roads in East Africa are not for the feint hearted!

Our campsite in the Masai Mara

Our campsite in the Masai Mara

Driving past a Masai Village

Driving past a Masai Village

Game Drive in the Masai Mara

Game Drive in the Masai Mara

Cheetah up close on a safari in the Masai Mara

Cheetah up close on a safari in the Masai Mara

Hanging out with the Masai in Kenya

Hanging out with the Masai in Kenya

Children of the Masai Mara

Children of the Masai Mara

Masai men doing their traditional high jump

Masai men doing their traditional high jump

A warning about hippos at Lake Naivasha

A warning about hippos at Lake Naivasha

Dinner time with the crew!  Awesome new friends!

Dinner time with the crew! Awesome new friends!

A boat trip on Lake Naivasha

A boat trip on Lake Naivasha

On an island nature walk with a baby zebra

On an island nature walk with a baby zebra

On a nature walk with wildebeest in the background

On a nature walk with wildebeest in the background

Time for a snack attack and water resupply at Naivasha

Time for a snack attack and water resupply at Naivasha

Spotted a white rhino at Lake Nakuru

Spotted a white rhino at Lake Nakuru

Our safari van with Lake Nakuru in the background

Our safari van with Lake Nakuru in the background

Sometimes the roads do get a little wet

Sometimes the roads do get a little wet

Finally we meet up with Freddy our truck again

Finally we meet up with Freddy our truck again

When in Africa....

When in Africa….

Yummy dinner time with Sean and a braai

Yummy dinner time with Sean and a braai

I recommend that you don't stay in the Msariri Hotel

I recommend that you don’t stay in the Msariri Hotel

At the border between Kenya and Uganda

At the border between Kenya and Uganda

A view over Lake Victoria in Uganda

A view over Lake Victoria in Uganda

Arriving at Ngamba Chip Sanctuary

Arriving at Ngamba Chip Sanctuary

Feeding time for the chimps

Feeding time for the chimps

Roadside Life in Entebbe

Roadside Life in Entebbe

Our Campsite in Kampala

Our Campsite in Kampala

Stay tuned for Part Two!!


Nomad’s 8 day Lesotho, Addo and Drakensberg tour – Part Three

We pass the town of Alice, seeing the University of Fort Hare where Nelson Mandela and other well-known politicians studied.  We then made our way on to Grahamstown, well known for it’s annual Arts Festival in July, but this time we just stopped for groceries for the next few days.

Nomad truck in Grahamstown

Nomad truck in Grahamstown

Time flies so quickly and my last stop on this tour is the Addo Elephant National Park.  Heading to the park we see Private Reserves along the highway and spot giraffes sitting on the ground (as there was clearly no threat to them).  We wait for a train to cross in front of us before we enter the park.  The keys for our chalets are collected and we make our way with Ella to our accommodation.  We were handed the keys and I had chalet 41, luggage off-loaded and I made my way to my own chalet.  WOW!!  I just smiled.  It was just so beautiful.  The double bed looked out onto a balcony overlooking the other chalets and the parks forests ahead.

My room in the park at Addo Elephant Park

My room in the park at Addo Elephant Park

The view from my balcony at Addo Elephant Park

The view from my balcony at Addo Elephant Park

After I took in the comforts of my room I quickly freshened up as we were to meet at the camping site to have lunch.  En route to lunch, I stopped over at the bird hide looking for interesting birds; walked over to the waterhole when a Kudu made its way down to the hole and I discovered that there was even an underground hide.  It was a lovely stroll to the camping site where Rimson was setting the lunch table.  Sven asked me if I would like to see a snake and I said yes!  Yes!!  I took my camera as we headed behind the truck…and there was the snake …a rubber snake!  There were independent travellers from South Africa and being regulars to Addo, they were aware of the Vervet monkeys that roamed the area in search of the food.  Apparently they stay away when they see the snakes ‘strategically’ placed around the couple’s cool kitchen camp setup.

Having lunch in the camp site at Addo Elephant Park

Having lunch in the camp site at Addo Elephant Park

Preparing the lunch at Addo National Park

Preparing the lunch at Addo National Park

Having fun in the kitchen at Addo Elephant National Park

Having fun in the kitchen at Addo Elephant National Park

Having a short briefing about our time in Addo

Having a short briefing about our time in Addo

Addo National Park is in the malaria-free Eastern Cape province of South Africa which is great for travellers who are pregnant or travelling with children.  There are elephants, lions, black rhinos, buffalos, leopards, zebra, and a variety of antelope and bird species in Addo.  I was very excited for my game drive.  After lunch, we collected our water bottles and jackets (as it started getting chilly).  All eagerly waiting with our camera’s and binoculars, we had to be back in camp as the gates closed at 18h30.

Kudu browsing in the veld in Addo National Park

Kudu browsing in the veld in Addo National Park

A zebra and her foal run alongside the truck in Addo

A zebra and her foal run alongside the truck in Addo

In distance we could see a herd of about 50 elephants crossing the road and heading to a waterhole.  Johannes slowly made his way and parked so that we could all get a view of the herd and admire these graceful creatures.  Elephants are my favourite animals so I was over the moon to see so many of them drinking water and watching the mothers look after the little ones.  The interaction of the herd was fascinating from bulls playing with each other to the little ones watching their mom’s every move and being camera shy.  Catching a glimpse or a snap of them was so difficult as they were almost always hidden behind their Mom.

A happy little Addo elephant family!

A happy little Addo elephant family!

The other end of the elephants

The other end of the elephants

It starting drizzling as we made our way to the other waterholes where we saw more elephants and more…we must have seen at least 150 elephants so far. The park was originally established to protect the remaining African elephants in Addo and it is doing a good job by conserving these majestic mammals.

More cute baby elephants!

More cute baby elephants!

A big thirsty elephant, imagine how much this one drinks in a day!

A big thirsty elephant, imagine how much this one drinks in a day!

We make our way to the gates to find Rimson to see if he has managed to fight off the monkeys near the kitchen camp, everything looks well protected from their cheeky little hands.  Dinner is ready and is smelling great!  We all sat under the canvas awning, drawn from the side of the Nomad truck and talked about the game drive.  It was a beautiful calm night and sadly, my last dinner with the group.  I was truly going to miss the African road.  It is something so special that every South African or lover of the wild should experience.

The last supper, with my new friends and family on the last night of my tour

The last supper, with my new friends and family on the last night of my tour

An early morning as we get ready for our game drive at 6am.  We saw zebra with their young, black backed jackals, kudu, ostriches, a buffalo, Red Hartebeest, warthogs, Leopard Tortoises and a scrub hare.  No luck with lions or leopards today but hey, I got to see my elephants.

Up close and personal with my favourite animal, the African Elephant

Up close and personal with my favourite animal, the African Elephant

We stopped for breakfast at Jack’s picnic site to fill our stomachs.  We were now making our way to the exit of the park driving to the Southern Gate to reach the N2.  Goodbye Addo see you again, soon I hope!

I reached Nomad’s post tour accommodation, the Eltham Lodge in Port Elizabeth at about 12h00.  A well located guest house about 5 minutes away from the airport and walking distance to the beachfront.

Port Elizabeth is known as the friendly city and it is where I had to say goodbye to my family as they headed  to Tsitsikamma National Park to end their tour in Cape Town.  I truly wished I was going to see more of my own beautiful country.

My tour family with truck Ella and guides Johannes, Rimson and Sven

My tour family with truck Ella and guides Johannes, Rimson and Sven

I met great people, had good fun, learnt more than I could have imagined and can’t wait for my next Nomad Adventure Tour…. see you on the road fellow nomads!

Me with my fellow Nomad crew, what an epic team!

Me with my fellow Nomad crew, what an epic team!